A Study of the Port of New York Authority

By Frederick L. Bird | Go to book overview

Chapter Nine
MOTOR TRUCK and BUS TERMINALS

THE IMPROVEMENT of transportation facilities, rather than of terminal facilities, has, in the past, accounted for most of the Port Authority's capital outlay for the unification and modernization of the Port District. While the Compact of 1921 and its Comprehensive Plan of port development emphasized both fields as essential objectives of the Authority, the overcoming of the interstate water barriers to rapid vehicular transportation placed sufficient demands on the organization's credit resources to preclude extensive undertakings concurrently in the development of those terminal facilities which were stressed by the Port Compact. Port Authority Inland Terminal No. I in Manhattan and the Grain Terminal in Brooklyn stand as successfully established terminal enterprises, however; and the Authority's postwar improvement program is concentrating on the motor, marine and air terminals which are urgently needed to bolster the economy of the Port District.

While the completion of the trans-Hudson crossings solved the problem of securing rapid, convenient, vehicular transit between the island commercial center of the Port District and the New Jersey mainland, it aggravated the traffic problem in Manhattan by pouring into the City's already crowded streets many new millions of vehicles per year, including vast numbers of heavy trucks and buses destined for markets, warehouses, piers and inadequate, scattered terminals that lacked accommodations for mass motor vehicle service. Other congested urban centers in the Port

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