A Study of the Port of New York Authority

By Frederick L. Bird | Go to book overview

Chapter Sixteen
A RECAPITULATION

THIS REVIEW of the origin, development and outlook of The Port of New York Authority has stressed the financial aspects of the Authority's history and plans because fiscal capacity and credit have been such basic prerequisites to progress and accomplishment. But it has sought also to show that the Port Authority is not merely a successful agency for constructing and operating public works that can be made to pay their way through service charges, but an increasingly effective instrumentality for the unified planning, protection and development of a vast and unusually complex metropolitan region.

The Port Authority was created by the States of New York and New Jersey in the Compact of 1921 to help secure "a better coordination of the terminal, transportation and other facilities of commerce" for the port of New York. Its first assignment was the final preparation for the legislatures of the Comprehensive Plan for the development of the port region; and research and planning for the unification of this great, bi-state, metropolitan area have continued to be one of its major functions. The Port Authority was also charged with the responsibility for protecting and advancing the commercial interests of the Port District by making recommendations to the two legislatures and to Congress, by petitioning any public body having jurisdiction in the District, by intervening in any proceeding affecting the commerce of the port, and by consulting with federal, state and municipal officials concerning such matters as highway, port and harbor improvements. The assiduous but unostentatious activities of the Authority along these lines have been among its most valuable contributions to the area's economic well-being.

But in addition to being entrusted with planning and protectional functions, the Port Authority was given extraordinarily broad powers to purchase, construct, lease and operate any terminal or transportation

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Study of the Port of New York Authority
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 193

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.