Sovereignty or Security? Government Policy in the Canadian North, 1936-1950

By Shelagh D. Grant | Go to book overview

prove on the present, to accommodate the needs of all northerners with those of the nation, and at the same time fulfil the dreams of many Canadians by preserving much of the north as a place of true wilderness.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

For assistance in my research, I am indebted to a number of individuals who were more than generous in their support of my endeavours: in the National Archives of Canada there was James Kidd from the Manuscript Division; from Government Documents, Terry Cook, Tom Nesmith, Mark Hopkins, David Smith, and their assistants; in the Historical Division of External Affairs, Dacre Cole; in the northern territories, the staff of Prince of Wales Heritage Centre at Yellowknife, and Diana Johnston of the Yukon Archives; in Britain, Donald Simpson of the Royal Commonwealth Society Library and Margaret Gowing, official historian of the British Atomic Energy Authority; and in Washington, Sally Marks of the National Archives, responsible for the diplomatic records of the State Department. With respect to personal inquiries, special thanks are due to those who took the time to discuss or write of their knowledge and experience: René Fumoleau, Maxwell Dunbar, Escott Reid, Graham Rowley, Louise Parkin, and Sheila Lougheed, sister of the Rt. Hon. Malcolm MacDonald, British High Commissioner to Canada during the war years. Very sincere appreciation goes to Trevor Lloyd who spent long hours in discussion and correspondence, continually adding new insight into the accumulated research and allowing the use of his original maps; to J. Lewis Robinson for his interest and editorial suggestions in the early stages; and, in the final hour, to Hugh Keenleyside who so kindly helped locate photographs, then read the entire manuscript for accuracy of detail. Thanks also to Margaret Tully and Lilian Rankin for their typing and retyping of the numerous drafts, to Betsy Struthers and Nicola Jarvis Jennings for their assistance in proofreading, to Louis Taylor, Barbara Fox, and Barbara Pitt of Trent University's Graphics Department, to Doug James for his cartography, and to my editor, Jane Fredeman, who deserves a very special mention for her ongoing encouragement and guidance. A number of my colleagues in history and Canadian Studies, including the late Brian Heeney, also offered their help and advice. To Bruce Hodgins, particularly, I owe an especially warm debt of gratitude for the initial inspiration and direction and his confidence in my ability to undertake the task at hand.

Over the past several years John Holmes played the role of critic and mentor with great patience and equal enthusiasm. Indeed, if it were not for his persistent encouragement that the story be told, this book might never have been completed. His passing this summer was a particularly sad mo

-xix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sovereignty or Security? Government Policy in the Canadian North, 1936-1950
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.