A Progression of Judges: A History of the Supreme Court of British Columbia

By David R. Verchere | Go to book overview

EIGHT
Lions Under the Throne

"The twelve judges of the realm are as the twelve lions under Solomon's throne. They must be lions, but yet lions under the throne, being circumspect that they do not check or oppose any points of sovereignty."

FRANCIS BACON

"The King is under God and the law."

EDWARD COKE 1

The massive historical treatise by Scholefield and Howay entitled British Columbia is frugal in describing the matter to which we now turn. On page 667, with admirable brevity, it says:

While the Supreme Court consisted of Chief Justice and Judges Crease and Gray, George A. Walkem, who was then Attorney General and Premier, passed in 1878 and 1879 various Acts, whereby the Province was divided into four districts, Victoria, Westminster, Clinton, and Cariboo, and it was ordered that a judge should reside in or near a specified town in each district. These Acts also made provision for two more judges and directed that the work of the County Courts should be performed by the Supreme Court judges. They further directed that the Rules of Court should be prepared by the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council, who also should fix the dates of the sittings of the Court. The judges took umbrage at this attempt to coerce and control them.

Unfortunately, these few words are not sufficient here. Any examination of the history of the Supreme Court of British Columbia demands that more detail be given of the executive and legislative action that so provoked the judges, and their response. But first, one must take a brief look at the changes that were made by both the federal and provincial governments in their efforts to streamline and improve the province's

-72-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Progression of Judges: A History of the Supreme Court of British Columbia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 200

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.