A Conspiracy of Optimism: Management of the National Forests since World War Two

By Paul W. Hirt | Go to book overview

Private memos from timber lobbyists in these years best reveal industry's undisguised views on multiple use. California timber executive Robert Hansen, in a 1959 letter to the Forest Service's Regional Forester in California, Charles Connaughton, said he was convinced that emphasizing "multiple use" offered "our best approach" to countering the lobbying efforts of the Sierra Club and getting more funds for national forest timber sales and roads. Perennial industry spokesman William Hagenstein (with the Industrial Forestry Association on the West Coast at the time) wrote to Alf Nelson and Ernest Kolbe, warning that a recently announced U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service survey of hunters and fishermen spelled "nothing but trouble" for the forest industries. He worried that the result of the survey would be "demand for less and less timber management in the national forests and more and more wildlife management, game refuges on State lands, recreational provisions, and all the other development needed for providing for the nimrods and Waltonians." With unerring foresight, Hagenstein added, "In three years take this letter out of the file and see if my forecast isn't at least partially correct." If anything, he underestimated the explosive public demand on federal land agencies to protect wildlife, wilderness, and recreational resources on public lands.41


Conclusion

The multiple users of the national forests began to really feel the pressure of conflicting demands during the Eisenhower era. Timber and recreation interests especially grew to perceive each other as entrenched opponents, each jockeying for position in the struggle over how the national forests would be managed. Forest Service leaders, on the other hand, genuinely believed there were enough resources for everyone, especially if Congress approved funds for intensive management. But timber and recreation lobbyists did not always share the agency's optimism, nor were they content to sit back and let the Forest Service call all the shots regarding forest management decisions. While industry lobbied heavily and successfully for maximum timber sale and road budgets, recreation interests pushed, mostly unsuccessfully, for earmarked recreation funds and wilderness zoning. Both endorsed long- range planning as a strategy for getting more of what they wanted and for helping the Forest Service to get more public and political support for its numerous programs.

Superficially, all interest groups agreed with the Forest Service that mul

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Conspiracy of Optimism: Management of the National Forests since World War Two
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.