Politics, Reform, and Expansion, 1890-1900

By Harold U. Faulkner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
The Election of 1892

WHEN Cleveland left the White House in March, 1889, he took up residence in New York City, where he joined the law firm of Bangs, Stetson, Tracy and MacVeagh, and in his conscientious and methodical manner carried on a busy practice, chiefly as a referee appointed by the courts. His friends and enemies alike believed that his public life was at an end; his enemies greeted his departure with delight. Henry Watterson said contemptuously, " Cleveland in New York reminds one of a stone thrown into a river. There is a 'plunk,' a splash, and then silence."1

Watterson's optimism was premature. By 1892 Cleveland was far from silent. At first he had enjoyed the relief from his presidential duties, and for about ten months after his defeat he remained in complete political retirement. Then he began to make public addresses on nonpolitical subjects. After 1890, however, moved by resentment over the McKinley tariff and encouraged by the Republican defeat in the congressional elections, he plainly signified his willingness to re-enter public life--always providing, of course, that he was called by the people once again to take up the onerous duties of office.2 It is true that he insisted, in a letter of March, 1891, that he was "in a miserable condition--a private citizen without political ambition trying to do private work and yet pulled and hauled and importuned daily and hourly to do things in a public and semi-public way which are hard

____________________
1
Quoted in Harry Thurston Peck, Twenty Years of the Republic ( New York, 1916), p. 252.
2
Allan Nevins (ed.), Letters of Grover Cleveland, 1850-1906 ( Boston, 1933) p. 201.

-119-

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Politics, Reform, and Expansion, 1890-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editors' Introduction ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Chapter 1 - The Restless Decade 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Revolt of the Cities 23
  • Chapter 3 - The Decline of Agriculture 48
  • Chapter 4 - Progress and Poverty 72
  • Chapter 5 - Billion-Dollar Politics 94
  • Chapter 6 - The Election of 1892 119
  • Chapter 7 - Depression, Bonds, and Tariffs 141
  • Chapter 8 - 1894 163
  • Chapter 9 - The Bryan Campaign 187
  • Chapter 10 - The Drums of War 212
  • Chapter II - The War with Spain 235
  • Chapter 12 - End of a Decade 260
  • Bibliography 281
  • Index 305
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