The Earlier Tudors, 1485-1558

By J. D. Mackie | Go to book overview

X
ROYAL SUPREMACY

B ETWEEN 1530 and 1534 Henry broke with the papacy. In the next six years he made the breach final by crushing active opposition and by seizing the lands of the monasteries, which he gave, usually at a fair price, to the English gentry. A great revolution was accomplished in a very short time and with remarkably little dislocation of the national affairs. It was achieved, it has been said, by king and parliament working together, and though this is true, there lurk behind the statement two compelling questions. Why did the king and the parliament wish to break away from Rome? How were they able to do it? It may be said at once that the motive force was that of Henry himself, never yet cheated of his desires and blessed with that convenient conscience; that the English king, whose bluff heartiness concealed a commanding intellect as well as egoism alternating unconcernedly between meanness and magnificence, revealed an uncanny ability to use parliament for his own ends; that the king's personal desires harmonized with the aspirations of the most active part of his people. Yet when all this is said, the ease with which the great change was effected demands explanation.

The first explanation lies in the atmosphere of the period. Revolution was in the air. Everywhere the facts were in rebellion against the theories and the waves of criticism were beating on the rock which, for so many centuries, had been a sure foundation of European society. Examined from a realist point of view the church no longer appeared as a divinely appointed reproduction of the ordered beauty of heaven. It seemed to be a human institution whose servants did not practice the righteousness which they preached and whose services and sacraments did not bring spiritual security even to those who obeyed its teaching to the best of their power.

The church was not in a healthy way; its standard of morality was not sufficiently above that of the world of laymen to justify the great privileges which it held. Often benefices had come to be regarded as the apanages of noble and gentle families; unspiritual men were appointed, and irregular marriages were

-335-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Earlier Tudors, 1485-1558
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 700

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.