The Earlier Tudors, 1485-1558

By J. D. Mackie | Go to book overview
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KEY TO GENEALOGICAL TABLE I
m. -- murdered.ex. -- executed.k. -- killed.d. -- died.A -- Anne Mortimer: if female descent is recognized York would take precedence over Lancaster.B -- Margaret Beaufort: if female descent is not recognized the Lancaster claim is defeated on the death of Henry VI, 1471, his son Edward having predeceased him ( K. Tewkesbury) 1471.
Descendants of Edward IV
Lady Jane Grey ( 1537-54).

Married to Guildford Dudley as part of a plot for altering the succession. Proclaimed queen, 1553. Executed by Mary Tudor after Wyatt's Rebellion, 1554.

Henry Courtenay, marquis of Exeter ( 1496?-1538).

Through his mother Catherine, heir to the English Crown should Henry VIII die without lawful issue. Powerful in Devon and Cornwall. Well known to stand for the old religion. Had intrigued with Chapuys. Discovered to have had communication with Montague and to have spoken against the king and his advisers to Sir Geoffrey Pole. Executed, as an aspirant to the Crown, 9 December 1538.


Descendants of George, duke of Clarence
Edward, earl of Warwick ( 1475-99).

Imprisoned in Tower for fourteen years. Finally executed, 28 November 1499, for alleged complicity with Perkin Warbeck.

Margaret, Lady Salisbury ( 1473-1541).

Compromised by corresponding with her son Reginald Pole. Henry VIII determined to destroy her whole family, therefore she was attainted 1539, imprisoned for two years, and executed 1541.

Henry Pole, Lord Montague ( 1492?-1538).

Took great care not to offend the government but was convicted of treason on the evidence of certain fragments of conversation in which he was said to have anticipated the king's death, to have regretted the abolition of the monasteries and the slavishness of parliament; his correspondence with Reginald Pole also told against him. Executed 9 December 1538.


Descendants of Elizabeth and John de la Pole, duke of Suffolk
John de la Pole, earl of Lincoln ( 1464?-87).

Killed at Stoke, fighting for Lambert Simnel, 1487.

Edmund de la Pole, earl of Suffolk ( 1472?-1513).

Fled to Flanders, because he was told that the Emperor Maximilian

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