A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography

By Dennis Thompson; John D. Hogano | Go to book overview

tries. To ascertain retarded development and to promote optimal development, culturally valid measures are needed that would build upon both cross-cultural research in the field and also within each sociocultural context. Both commonalities and differences would need to be taken into consideration, integrating comparative standards and culture-sensitive conceptualization.

It is with these considerations that we undertook the Turkish Early Enrichment Project. Supporting the mothers to support their children's overall development and school readiness entailed using comparative school-related cognitive standards, but this was done within a culturally relevant contextual approach. Our research experience and the applications emerging from our project have reinforced my belief in the feasibility of such an integrative approach, combining comparative standards of human development with culturally sensitive endogenous conceptualizations of well-being.

Our study and its policy-relevant outcomes have also strengthened my conviction about the potential of psychology to contribute to societal well-being. Developmental psychology in particular can contribute significantly to global efforts to promote human potential development if it accepts both a scientifically and socially responsible self-definition. Human development is the core of societal development, and psychology is centrally relevant to it.


Notes
1.
A short historical background may be in order here. The Turkish Republic was founded in 1923. The predecessor of the Turkish Republic was the Ottoman Empire, which lasted for six centuries and expanded outward from Anatolia (the land of modern Turkey) to the Arabic Peninsula, Egypt, and North Africa, and from the Caucasus to the Balkans north to Vienna at its height at the end of the sixteenth century. During the eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries the Ottoman Empire's reign was challenged through continuous wars leading to territory losses. The state also failed to keep up with the great ideological, economic, and industrial achievements in western Europe and fell into backwardness.

It was against this background that the Ottoman Empire entered World War I siding with Germany, mainly in response to British political activity instigating ethnic/national independence movements throughout the Ottoman Empire. When the war was lost, Istanbul and Anatolia, the central heartland of the Ottoman Empire, were occupied.

This was the starting point of the resistance movements emerging in many places in Anatolia that were successfully merged under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. A war of independence was fought for three years against the armies of the occupying forces all over Anatolia and against all odds was miraculously won. In the process, Ottoman rule was defied and rejected, and a national assembly was instituted.

In 1923 the republic was established, the sultanate and the caliphate were abolished (the Ottoman sultans had also been the caliphs of the Islamic world since the occupation of Egypt in the sixteenth century). Atatürk was elected the first president of the Turkish Republic, and a series of reforms was enacted during the first two decades of the republican era. These covered all spheres of civil society. Most important, they entailed secularization

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A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • References x
  • 1 - Louise Bates Ames 1
  • Notes 21
  • References 21
  • 2 - James Emmett Birren 24
  • References 44
  • 3 - Marie Skodak Crissey 46
  • Notes 69
  • Representative Publications 69
  • 4 - David Elkind 71
  • References 83
  • 5 - Dale B. Harris 84
  • References 103
  • 6 - Lois Wladis Hoffman 105
  • References 119
  • 7 - Çiǧdem KaǧitçebaŞi 121
  • Notes 133
  • Representative Publications 133
  • 8 - Lewis P. Lipsitt 137
  • References 158
  • 9 - Paul Mussen 161
  • References 177
  • 10 - Seymour Wapner 180
  • Notes 199
  • References 199
  • About the Book and Editors 209
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