A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography

By Dennis Thompson; John D. Hogano | Go to book overview

rector in 1990 on a two-year leave of absence from Brown. So confident was I that I could be very useful to the APA and to psychology and that I could rely on my fellow executives of APA for common purpose and personal support, that I did not even insure that I had a properly executed contract when, after some wooing and special pleading by the chief executive officer of the association, I took the job. This oversight on my part was perhaps a matter of excessive risk taking, to which I am disposed and to which I have earlier alluded. I fell victim to false accusations after completing eighteen months of my intended two-year stay in that position. I learned painfully that personal integrity and desire for constructive change are not always golden keys to success in a large organization. I learned, more than one can by reading, about David and Goliath. I. learned from personal experience that assaults on an individual's personhood are just as serious and just as debilitating as the author of the Ten Commandments warned.

Hoping to help my "parent organization" move toward a happier state in which scientists and clinicians alike would find the organization hospitable, I have run twice for the APA presidency. The outpouring of support that my candidacy attracted has been reward enough for now. I ran second among five candidates on both occasions. Although my loss of the elections in the midst of foul political publicity has formed the lowest spot of my life, these years have also provided a truly validating experience as so many friends, colleagues, and family members rose to my defense and provided much needed psychological support. Nonetheless, harassment by false accusation is no fun.

My mother lived long enough to tell me, when she was in her eighties and when I, in my fifties, was deeply immersed in my teaching and research career, "Lew, you're working too hard." My father, a literate man who spoke fine English, lived to greet me frequently with a smart smile, calling out "Hello, Perfessah!"

In my turn, I lived to please them, to enjoy my siblings and their families, to have a long-lasting love affair with Edna, to enjoy beyond description my wonderful son and daughter, to relish the estimations of highly respected scientists who think that I have contributed substantially to my field, and to have very fine, bright, scholarly, humorous friends. I have had many, many laughs. I have, finally, had a great deal of fun. Strange that I should feel I haven't Done enough, but there it is. I have been very lucky.


References

carmichael, L. ( 1954). Manual of child psychology. New York: Wiley.

Hunt, J. McV. ( 1961). Intelligence and experience. New York: Ronald Press.

Hunt, J. McV. (Ed.). ( 1944). Personality and the behavior disorders: A handbook based on experimental and clinical research. New York: Ronald Press.

Lewin, K. ( 1931). The conflict between Aristotelian and Galilean modes of thought in contemporary psychology. Journal of General Psychology, 5, 141-177.

Maier, N. R. E. ( 1949). Frustration: The study of behavior without a goal. New York: McGraw-Hill.

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A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • References x
  • 1 - Louise Bates Ames 1
  • Notes 21
  • References 21
  • 2 - James Emmett Birren 24
  • References 44
  • 3 - Marie Skodak Crissey 46
  • Notes 69
  • Representative Publications 69
  • 4 - David Elkind 71
  • References 83
  • 5 - Dale B. Harris 84
  • References 103
  • 6 - Lois Wladis Hoffman 105
  • References 119
  • 7 - Çiǧdem KaǧitçebaŞi 121
  • Notes 133
  • Representative Publications 133
  • 8 - Lewis P. Lipsitt 137
  • References 158
  • 9 - Paul Mussen 161
  • References 177
  • 10 - Seymour Wapner 180
  • Notes 199
  • References 199
  • About the Book and Editors 209
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