A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography

By Dennis Thompson; John D. Hogano | Go to book overview

The current emphasis on contextualism is salutary because it acknowledges that the phenomena with which we are most concerned are multiply determined. Often, relevant investigations must be multidisciplinary, with inputs ftom specialists in health, anthropology, economics, sociology, and other disciplines. Statistical techniques such as multiple and partial correlations, as well as path analysis, are available to assess the relative contribution of each antecedent, and undoubtedly even more efficient statistical techniques will be available in the future. Enlarging our armamentarium of research methods to incorporate hermeneutic and narrative techniques, family history, psychobiography, and other creative approaches may also yield important information and ideas.

Contextualism also calls attention to the limitations of generalization from empirical findings, acknowledging that our findings may hold at a particular time or place but not have universal applicability. Contemporary research will not discover universal principles but may suggest better questions for future study.

Developmental psychology is an exciting, expanding field that holds great promise of achieving the objective to which it is dedicated, "the promotion of human welfare throughout the life cycle," by systematic investigation of significant issues. By focusing our efforts and expertise on the task, we can deliver what is promised: solid knowledge that can be applied by enlightened policymakers and authorities in ways that will greatly benefit individuals and society.


References

Bayer, L. & Bayley, N. ( 1975). Growth diagnosis. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Block, J. (in collaboration with Norma Haan). ( 1971). Lives through time. Berkeley: Bancroft.

Clausen, L. A. ( 1993). American lives. New York: The Free Press.

Dollard, J. & Miller, N. E. ( 1950). Personality and psychotherapy. NewYork: McGraw-Hill.

Eichorn, D. H.,& Clausen, J. A., Haan, N., Honzik, M. P. & Mussen, P. H. (Eds.). ( 1981). Present and past in middle life. New York: Academic Press.

Eisenberg, N. & Mussen, P. H. ( 1989). Roots of prosocial behavior. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Elder, G. H., Jr. ( 1974). Children of the great depression. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Erikson, E. ( 1992). Vital involvement in old age. New York: Norton.

Haan, N. ( 1977). Coping and defending. New York: Academic Press.

Jones, M., Bayley, N., J. MacFarlane & Honzik, M. ( 1971). The course of human development. New York: Wiley.

Langer, J. ( 1980). The origins of logic. New York: Academic Press.

Mussen, P. H. ( 1950). "Some personality and social factors related to changes in children's attitudes toward Negroes". Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 45, 423-441.

Mussen, P. H. ( 1963). The psychological development of the child. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: 2 Prentice-Hall.

Mussen, P. H. (Ed.). ( 1970). Carmichael's manual of child psychology ( 3rd ed., 2 vols.). New York: Wiley.

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A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • References x
  • 1 - Louise Bates Ames 1
  • Notes 21
  • References 21
  • 2 - James Emmett Birren 24
  • References 44
  • 3 - Marie Skodak Crissey 46
  • Notes 69
  • Representative Publications 69
  • 4 - David Elkind 71
  • References 83
  • 5 - Dale B. Harris 84
  • References 103
  • 6 - Lois Wladis Hoffman 105
  • References 119
  • 7 - Çiǧdem KaǧitçebaŞi 121
  • Notes 133
  • Representative Publications 133
  • 8 - Lewis P. Lipsitt 137
  • References 158
  • 9 - Paul Mussen 161
  • References 177
  • 10 - Seymour Wapner 180
  • Notes 199
  • References 199
  • About the Book and Editors 209
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