Psychological Processes and Advertising Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications

By Linda F. Alwitt; Andrew A. Mitchell | Go to book overview

2
Affective and Cognitive
Antecedents of Attitude
Toward the Ad: A Conceptual
Framework

Richard J. Lutz Marketing Department University of Florida


INTRODUCTION

The past few years have witnessed a rekindling of interest in the nature and effects of consumers' affective reactions to advertising stimuli. In contrast to earlier researchers' tendency to focus primarily on these affective reactions as criterion variables in their own right, recent researchers have investigated the construct attitude-toward-the-ad (Aad) as a mediator of advertising's effects on brand attitudes and purchase intentions ( Mitchell & Olson, 1981; Shimp, 1981).

The recent research attention focused on Aad parallels current persuasion research in social cognition in its explicit recognition that affective responses, as well as cognitive responses, are important indicants of overall message effectiveness. In particular, the elaboration likelihood model (ELM) posited by Petty and Cacioppo ( 1981) serves as a useful framework for integrating Aad effects and the more commonly utilized brand attribute ratings. The ELM postulates two basic routes by which a persuasive communication may exert influence on its audience: central processing, wherein message content is the primary influence, and peripheral processing, in which the audience is affected more by the source of the message or contextual factors than by actual message content. Petty and Cacioppo explicitly consider the role of audience involvement in their analysis of which persuasion route is likely to be dominant in a particular communication setting: the higher the involvement, the greater the tendency toward central processing. Given the increasingly widely held assumption that most advertising is inherently uninvolving, the peripheral route to persuasion, as represented by Aad, has intuitive appeal as a mechanism for understanding the effects of advertising on consumers.

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychological Processes and Advertising Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 305

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.