Psychological Processes and Advertising Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications

By Linda F. Alwitt; Andrew A. Mitchell | Go to book overview

ceptualization. Finally, the source of attitude toward the ad is likey to have important effects on the causal links with brand attitude. Lutz (this volume) presents several ideas concerning what aspects of advertising are likely to generate attitudinal reactions. The next step in this line of thought is to determine how the source of attitude toward the ad influences brand attitude. It is quite possible that different sources of affective reactions are linked to brand attitude through different routes. If so, then it would seem fruitless to pursue research on the global effects of attitude toward the ad.

In sum, we suggest that both the valence and intensity of feeling evoked by an ad exert an influence on brand attitude. While we do not believe that ads are especially strong affective stimuli, we do believe that within the range of reactions to advertising, those ads on the poles of an affective continuum have a greater impact on brand familiarity than neutral, matter-of-fact advertising. It may be that extreme ads receive more attention at exposure or that associations resulting from those ads are stronger. In either case, the benefits of increased brand familiarity would seem to be particularly important for low involvement situations and for new, unfamiliar brands.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Support for this research was provided by a summer research grant from the College of Business Administration and the Center for Econometric Decision Sciences at the University of Florida. The authors wish to express appreciation to Linda Alwitt, Joel Cohen, Richard J. Lutz and Andy Mitchell for comments on an earlier draft of the chapter.


REFERENCES

Axelrod , J. N. ( 1968). Advertising measures that predict purchase. Journal of Advertising Research, 8, 3-17.

Batra, R., & Ray, M. L. ( 1983) "Advertising situations: The implications of differential involvement and accompanying affect responses". In R. Harris (Ed.), Information Processing Research in Advertising. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 127-158.

Capon, N., & Hulbert, J. ( 1973). The sleeper effect -- an awakening. Public Opinion Quarterly, 37, 333-358.

Cohen, J., & Cohen, P. ( 1975). Applied multiple regression/correlation analysis for the behavioral sciences. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Cook, T. D., & Flay, B. R. ( 1978). The persistence of experimentally induced attitude change. In L. Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology: Volume 11. New York, NY: Academic Press, 1-57.

Cook, T. D., Gruder, C. L., Hennigan, K. M., & Flay, B. R. ( 1979). History of the sleeper effect: Some logical pitfalls in accepting the null hypothesis. Psychological Bulletin, 86, 662-679.

Crowder, R. G. ( 1976). Principles of learning and memory. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

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