A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies

By Joyce E. Canaan; Debbie Epstein | Go to book overview

8
Mirrors, Paintings, and Romances

Ramón Flecha and Victòria dels Àngels Garcia translated by Jocelyn Olcott


Introduction

This chapter is concerned with questions of pedagogy and power as they are played out in the context of Cultural Studies taught within an Adult Education (AE) programme across several European countries. The chapter is organised in three sections. The first takes the example of a European Union programme in order to raise the question of power relations in the pedagogy of Cultural Studies between northern and southern European universities and people. The second section discusses the ways in which 'northernist' voices try to subordinate southerners in the production of knowledge about Cultural Studies. The third section moves to the popular culture of a working-class area to seek orientations toward the teaching of Cultural Studies which would produce a more egalitarian Cultural Studies in European universities.

The European Union (EU) funds exchanges between professors and students from different European universities. The Erasmus programme (currently being replaced by Socrates) involves mobility within the EU, while the new Alpha programme will develop relationships between European and Latin American universities. This new programme presents both possibilities and dangers. On the one hand, it provides an enormous opportunity to build solidarity and to create egalitarian intercultural collaborations. On the other, this could provide the opportunity for Euro

We dedicate this chapter to Núria, of Caldes de Montbui. An illness took Núria
soon after she completed her participation in the European program analyzed in
this chapter, but her memory continues to inspire us to pursue our cultural strug
gle to overcome ethnocentrism through this type of exchange.

-131-

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