Laboring for Freedom: A New Look at the History of Labor in America

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Acknowledgments

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the assistance and encouragement I received from others during the course of this book. Foremost, I want to thank Bruce Kochis, who scrutinized both the structure and content of my work. Not only did he read my manuscript carefully, but he also knew how to provide feedback that my delicate ego could process. I also want to thank the students, particularly Priscilla Holcomb, Tobin Dale, and Angie Douglas, who, after struggling through relatively unedited copies, commented on those early versions of this manuscript. Melvyn Dubofsky deserves two thanks, one for being the extraordinary undergraduate teacher who interested me in my subject, and the second, for his helpful suggestions in reviewing the manuscript for M.E. Sharpe. Upon their readings, Michael Honey and Alan Wood each provided ideas as well as moral support. Elinore Appel provided constructive and painstaking editorial assistance. My program director, Jane Decker, made it possible for me to find time to write despite a new baby and ever pressing departmental needs. The University of Washington generously provided financial support during the summer of 1994. I also wish to express appreciation to Marc Stern, Phillip Cushman, Constantin Behler, John Braeman, and C. Patrick Morris, all of whom have contributed to the making of this book. Finally, I want to thank my wife, Nancy Beaudet, who, over the years, has kept me a whole human being.

-ix-

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