Laboring for Freedom: A New Look at the History of Labor in America

By Daniel Jacoby | Go to book overview
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Notes

Prologue
1.
Selig Perlman, A Theory of the Labor Class, New York: Kelly, 1928. For more recent considerations, see Kim Voss, The Making of American Exceptionalism: The Knights of Labor and Class Formation in the Nineteenth Century, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1993; William E. Forbath, Law and the Shaping of the American Labor Movement, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1991, pp. 10-36.
2.
Morton Horwitz, The Transformation of American Law, 1780-1860-1960, New York: Oxford University Press, 1992, and "The Historical Foundations of Modern Contract Law," Harvard Law Review 87, no. 5 ( March 1974): 917-956.
3.
Two modern versions of the exploitation thesis appear in Harry Braverman, Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century, New York: Monthly Review Press, 1974; and Michael Burawoy, Manufacturing Consent: Changes in the Labor Process under Monopoly Capital, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979.
4.
See, George S. McGovern and Leonard F. Guttridge, The Great Coalfield War, Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 1996, pp. 20-21. For a more general treatment of the issues of control, see also Richard Edwards, Contested Terrain: The Transformation of the Workplace, New York: Basic Books, 1979.
5.
Milton Friedman is now the classic exponent of this view. See Capitalism and Freedom, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982; and, with Rose Friedman, Free to Choose: A Personal Statement, New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.
6.
For one of the earliest and best rationalizations of collective bargaining, see J. R. Commons , The Legal Foundations of Capitalism, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1957. More recently, see the work of Richard Freeman and James Medoff, What Do Unions Do? New York: Basic Books, 1984.
7.
For contemporary analyses of the failures of markets, see Robert Kuttner, Everything for Sale: The Virtues and Limits of Markets, New York: Knopf, 1997. One important and recent argument that law failed to adjust sufficiently to satisfy the needs of industrialization is found in Forbath, Law and the Shaping of the American Labor Movement.

Chapter 1. Republican Soil
1.
J. G.A. Pocock, Politics, Language, and Time: Essays on Political Thought and History, New York: Atheneum, 1971, p. 92. See also, generally, Gordon Wood, The Radicalism of the American Revolution, New York: Vintage, 1991.
2.
Peter Laslett, The World We Have Lost: England Before the Industrial Age, 3d ed., New York: Macmillan, 1984, p. 38.
3.
See, generally, Douglass North and Robert Thomas, The Rise of the WesternWorld: A New Economic History

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