Laboring for Freedom: A New Look at the History of Labor in America

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Bibliography

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-----. The Turbulent Years: A History of the American Worker, 1933-1941. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, Sentry Edition, 1969.

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-----. Democracy and Capitalism: Property, Community and the Contradictions of Modern Social Thought. New York: Basic Books, 1986.

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