English Literary Periodicals

By Walter Graham | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

This, the first general survey of English literary periodicals that has ever been written, makes no claim to exhaustiveness or finality. The author does not regard it as a definitive work, nor does he expect it to escape the criticism to which the pioneer in any field is usually subjected. In an undertaking so broad as that which overlooks two and one half centuries of English literature no one can be infallible; and the writer of this book recognizes many weaknesses in his completed work--weaknesses that more concentrated effort on special fields, and the always advancing knowledge of individual investigators, will remedy in later histories of English literary periodicals.

The writer's many obligations are here acknowledged with gratitude, even though, for the most part, this may be done only by a general avowal. In particular, he wishes to thank Mr. Laurence F. Powell, of the Taylor Institution, Oxford, Mr. J. G. Muddiman, of London, Professor David Nichol Smith, of Oxford, and Professor George W. Sherburn, of Chicago, for valuable counsel. He owes much to his colleagues, Professor Jacob Zeitlin, Dr. Caroline F. Tupper, Dr. Clarissa Rinaker, and Dr. Homer Caskey, for critical opinions or aid in collecting material, as well as to the various editors of periodicals now in progress for information of a nature difficult to secure. Notable scholars in the field to whom especial acknowledgment of debt must be made are Professor Chester N. Greenough, Professor Roger P. McCutcheon, and Professors Ronald S. Crane and the late F. B. Kaye, compilers of the Census of British Newspapersand Periodicals. To Winifred Gregory and the anonymous compilers of the Union List of Serials, the

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