English Literary Periodicals

By Walter Graham | Go to book overview

IX
THE LATER REVIEWS AND THE FORTNIGHTLY

Several excellent periodical publications are worth notice as obvious efforts to exploit the success of the Edinburgh, Quarterly and Westminster. The Investigator, was a 240-page quarterly review, edited 1820-24 by W. B. Collyer , T. Raffles, and J. B. Brown. Its only claim to interest here lies in its occasional criticisms of contemporary authors. The British Critic, Quarterly Theological Review and Ecclesiastical Record ( 1827- 1843), as its title implies, devoted itself mainly to religious matters. Under the successive editors, Edward Smedley, J. S. Boone , John Henry Newman, and others, it published, in spite of its theological bias, some criticism of value. The Dublin Review of London, which was begun in 1836 and is now approaching its centenary as a prosperous enterprise, is a better example of a real imitator. Up to 1890 it contained occasional critical reviews of significance, but in recent years has been almost completely nonliterary. India in English literature was extensively treated through the excellent 250-page quarterly, the Calcutta-Review ( 1844- 1896), a popular and interesting imitator of the great London and Edinburgh Reviews. The North British Review of Edinburgh, a heavy quarterly publication of 284 pages, edited by Dr. David Welsh and contributed to by David Brewster, contained much good material in occasional literary articles, and was a conscientious imitator of its great rival, the Edinburgh Review. It appeared from 1844 to 1877. The Irish Quarterly Review of 1851 ( Dublin) was another slavish follower of the Edinburgh tradition, but the New Quarterly Review

-256-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
English Literary Periodicals
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 430

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.