Art in Latin American Architecture

By Paul F. Damaz | Go to book overview

Contemporary Art in Latin America

Concurrently with modern architecture, the new trends in modern painting appeared in Latin America during the 1920's. The reaction against the academic tradition of the 19th century took the strongest nationalistic form in Mexico and, to a lesser degree, in the Andean countries of Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador. In countries such as Brazil and Cuba, where there is a considerable Negro element in the population, much modern painting until recently expressed popular themes and traditions according to modern European schools. In most other countries, modern painting has never shown strong local influences but is essentially a reflection of European and sometimes North American tendencies. Since 1950, the acceptance of abstract art by most young Latin American painters has had the effect of minimizing local native influences and of integrating Latin American painting with contemporary international schools.


MEXICO

In the field of art, Mexico has been the most active of the Latin American countries. Mexican painters are the only ones who have created a truly original style of painting which has influenced the art of many countries in the Western hemisphere.

Although native art had been largely destroyed during the conquest, Indian creativeness survived in the work of village craftsmen. The plastic forms of simple grandeur, the stylistic designs, the bright colors lived on in the shadow of colonial art. At the end of the 19th century, a few isolated artists were still working independently, producing a self-taught art and disregarding the official norms. One such artist was José Guadalupe Posada, an engraver and illustrator of popular songs, whose shop was near the San Carlos Academy. His work had such a strong influence on the young painters, particularly Diego Rivera and José Clemente Orozco, that Posada has been called the father of the Mexican school of painting.

However, the development of the new school of painting was really brought about by the revolution of 1910-1917. Many young painters, intellectuals and writers, influenced by the revolutionary ideas of Gerardo Murillo, an artist who hated his Spanish origins so much that he took the Aztec name of Dr. Atl (Water), joined the revolution and took an active part in it. Out of their revolutionary ideas, a new conception of art was loudly proclaimed: art belongs to the people, just as Mexico belongs to the Indian people. David Alfaro Siqueiros, the most violent of the revolutionary artists, demanded "a new revolutionary art based on the constructive vitality of Indian art and decrying outworn European ideas."

Inspired by Siqueiros, and under the leadership of Diego Rivera, the Syndicate of Technical Workers, Painters and Sculptors was founded in 1922. In one of their manifestos, the members of the Syndicate declared that "not only honorable labor but the smallest expression of the physical and spiritual life of our race springs from the native, with his admirable and extraordinary peculiar gift of creating beauty. The art of

-52-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Art in Latin American Architecture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.