Art in Latin American Architecture

By Paul F. Damaz | Go to book overview

Theaters, Restaurants, Clubs and Commercial Buildings
Community Theater, Marechal Hermes, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1950 Architect: Affonso Eduardo Reidy. Artists: Paulo Werneck, Roberto Burle Marx. This small theater was built in the suburbs of Rio de Janeiro to bring plays, dance, music and instructive lectures to the local population. It is an attractive building consisting of two simple interpenetrating volumes, made bright and cheerful by the blue, white and yellow ceramic tiles designed by Paulo Werneck. They are well located on the side walls, emphasizing the folded plate appearance of walls and roof. The building is surrounded by gardens designed by Burle Marx, who also designed a playful stage curtain woven by Lili Correia de Araújo.

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Art in Latin American Architecture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Picture Credits 6
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • Color Illustrations 8
  • Contents 9
  • Author's Note 11
  • Preface 13
  • Foreword 14
  • Part 1 19
  • Sources of Latin American Culture 23
  • The Pre-Columbian Heritage 27
  • Colonial Art and Architecture 35
  • Modern Architecture 42
  • Contemporary Art in Latin America 52
  • Art in Modern Architecture 68
  • Part 2 107
  • Schools 129
  • Theaters, Restaurants, Clubs and Commercial Buildings 155
  • Hospitals and Religious Buildings 168
  • Hotels, Apartment Buildings and Private Houses 183
  • Monuments and Memorials 197
  • Landscape Architecture 208
  • Experimental Architecture 222
  • Bibliography 230
  • Index 231
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