The Divided Academy: Professors and Politics

By Everett Carll Ladd Jr.; Seymour Martin Lipset | Go to book overview

9. Persisting Effects of the 1960s:
The 1972 Presidential Election

note:In the summer of 1972, after the national nominating conventions of both major parties had completed their work, we became convinced of the desirability of surveying the electoral leanings of academics, and initiated the second survey described in the introduction to this volume. In particular, we were interested in the possible effects or spinoffs of the intense politicization and divisiveness which universities had experienced over the preceding half decade or so. Many academics who had been identified in the past as liberals and Democrats found themselves in alliance with conservatives to prevent actions they considered a threat to the integrity of the university and scholarship.

Opinion was divided about protests and demonstrations against the Vietnam War, some of which resulted in the seizure of buildings and similar confrontations, and about all the attendant arguments concerning the use of police, the proper role and responsibilities of the university, and the like. Demands for "affirmative action" or for quotas in hiring of blacks and women for professional positions and in admitting students were seen by some as appropriate university actions on behalf of equality and by others as assaults on meritocracy. Charges of racism within the academy and insistence upon vigorous steps to eradicate it were applauded by proponents of affirmative action as essential to full freedom for blacks, and rejected by opponents as inviting "smear tactics" and thus posing a threat to academic freedom. These and related conflicts over the last five years or so have produced sharp separations among faculty that divide opinion in a way which is very different from the conventional liberal-conservative axis.

Such intracampus controversies seem linked to a broader ideological division in the American intellectual community. It is far less meaning-

____________________
note:
The subject of this chapter has been examined at greater length in another of our publications: Ladd and Lipset ( 1973a).

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Divided Academy: Professors and Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.