Re-Thinking Missions: A Laymen's Inquiry after One Hundred Years

By William Ernest Hocking; Laymen's Foreign Missions Inquiry. Commission of Appraisal | Go to book overview

the first missionaries. It would also be as difficult. It might mean registering these schools as Institutes, studying the old apprenticeship method of education to see what it had to teach us at the present day, selecting one craft, or two, such as the school's equipment would permit, finding and employing artisans who could teach that craft, and working these men into the teaching staff, while not diminishing the strength of the intellectual education which would make the other significant. It would mean cutting down that excess of numbers which at present are necessary to meet expenses. It would mean meeting those expenses in other ways: some schools have done this by selling the results of the student's craftsmanship. It would mean keeping close to the life of China, through watching its own notable experiments in the work of such educators as C. H. Chuang, P. C. Chang, Po Ling Chang, W. T. Tao, Y. C. James Yen. not to imitate them for evangelizing purposes, but realizing that they are nearer the heart of their people, to learn much from that genius which promises important contributions to the future educational wisdom of the world.

It was chiefly in the schools of the Mass Education Movement that we felt the spirit of sacrifice and of a warm human devotion touched with a patriotic vision actually quickening the consciousness of young people. Whether carried on by Confucian or Christian, this movement spread abroad that quality which we have come to think of as the spirit of Christ. All told we have seen nothing in the Orient more wisely and honorably planned and nothing promising so much for the equipment of China in mind and character.


Conclusions and Recommendations

It is evident that the mission schools, while adapting themselves slowly to the new situation created by the Chinese Revolution, are doing comparatively little to respond to the new tasks which China as a whole is undertaking. It is an unparalleled opportunity to aid in a vast and critical national transformation.

-160-

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