Re-Thinking Missions: A Laymen's Inquiry after One Hundred Years

By William Ernest Hocking; Laymen's Foreign Missions Inquiry. Commission of Appraisal | Go to book overview

Index to Recommendations
Accounting methods, 310-312
Administrative unity and cooperation, 93, 329
Agricultural missions, 234-236
Aim of missions, 59, 325
Ambassadorship attitude, 26
Attitude toward other faiths, 326
Board of specialists on mission schools, 163
Business men, relations with, 251
Burma, schools, 143
Cheeloo University, 210
China, 115
Christian Literature Societies, 193
Churches, indigenous, 106
sectarianism in the mission field, 92-94
self-support, 115
subsidies, 108
Church-planting, 108-110
Colleges, 167, 170-172, 177-179
Concentration of effort, 328
Continuance of missions, 4, 325
Cooperation, 328
Country-Life workers' world congress, 233
Devolution, 305-306, 328
Diffusion and concentration, 302- 304
Economic philosophies, attitude toward, 254
Education (see Colleges, Higher education, Primary education, Schools, Secondary education)
Evangelism, 65, 143, 199
women in, 286
Finance, 151, 162, 212, 307-310
Higher education, 167, 177-179
Idealism in missionary work, 97
India, 115
women, 284-286
Industry, 249-254
women, 285
Japan, 115
women, 284-286
Labor unions, 252
Literature, 192-193
Medical work, 200, 209-212
women, 285
Meditation in Christianity, 45-46
Orientation schools for field workers, 293
Permeative influence, 327
Personnel, 115, 135, 143, 178, 206, 234, 289-302, 327
Primary education, 162
Religious exercises, 168
Reorganization at the home base, 319-323
"Report on Christian Education in Japan," 152
Research, 46-48, 234, 250
Salaries, 294
Schools, in general for the Far East, 163
in Burma, 143
in China, 160-162
in India, 134
in Japan, 148, 151
Scope of missions, 326
Secondary education, 162
Sharing of religion among faiths, 47, 48
Teachers, in India, 135

-331-

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