American Painting of the Nineteenth Century: Realism, Idealism, and the American Experience

By Barbara Novak | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO CHAPTER ONE
1.
The limner style was rooted not only in an indigenous craft tradition, which included such skills as sign-making, but in the linear traditions of Tudor and Jacobean England, in late sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Dutch art, and in the English seventeenth- and eighteenth-century courtly tradition, which perpetuated an increasingly rigid painterly convention through Van Dyck to Sir Peter Lely and Sir Godfrey Kneller, reaching the colonies largely via the mezzotint.
2.
See E. H. Gombrich, Art and Illusion ( New York: Pantheon, 1960), Bollingen Series XXXV, 5; especially chapter 9, "The Analysis of Vision in Art", pp. 291 ff.
3.
Perry Miller, Errand into the Wilderness ( New York: Harper, 1964), "The Rhetoric of Sensation", p. 177.
4.
Ibid., "From Edwards to Emerson," p. 185. See also p. 195, where, on the issue of mystical tendencies in Edwards, Perry Miller observes, "assuming as we have some right to assume, that what subsequent generations find to be a hidden or potential implication in a thought is a part of that thought, we may venture to feel that Edwards was particularly careful to hold in check the mystical and pantheistical tendencies of his teaching because he himself was so apt to become a mystic and a pantheist."
5.
Ibid., p. 202. Quoting Professor George Whicher.
6.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Basic Writings of America's Sage, ed. Edward C. Lindeman ( New York: New American Library, Mentor Books, 1947), "Beauty", p. 114.
7.
North American Review, LXXXI ( 1855), 221.
8.
James Jackson Jarves, The Art-Idea ( Hurd and Houghton, 1864; ed. Benjamin Rowland, Jr. , Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1960), p. 86.
9.
Copley-Pelham Letters, letter of August 4, 1766 ( Massachusetts Historical Society Collections, 1914), LXXI, p. 44.
11.
Ibid.
15.
James Thomas Flexner, Gilbert Stuart ( New York: Knopf, 1955), p. 63.

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Painting of the Nineteenth Century: Realism, Idealism, and the American Experience
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.