Rebel Radio: The Story of El Salvador's Radio Venceremos

By José Ignacio López Vigil; Mark Fried | Go to book overview

Section I
The General Offensive

Enter the Viking

Jonás 1 turned up at my house in Mexico.

"We've got to have a radio station," he said. "We'll bust our balls to get it."

In El Salvador at that time, at the end of the seventies, things had turned black as ants. The repression was brutal. Print media was no longer effective. If you had a leaflet in your bag, it could cost you your life. Was it worth risking the lives of those handing leaflets out, to say nothing of those accepting them? Maybe that's why the idea of a radio station took root -- they can't frisk you for a voice.

There was no place for us in the media. The left-wing papers had been closed down. La Crónica del Pueblo and El Independiente had both been bombed. They had begun to dynamite Monsignor Romero's 2 radio station. Journalists were being threatened, murdered, gagged, no one could tell anyone about anything. Our brief takeovers of radio stations were something, but not much.

"We need technical support," Jonás insisted.

I had a few contacts at the University of Guadalajara. That's where we found Toño, an electrical engineer, a dreamer, one of those people who never makes any money because he spends his life looking for meaning in what he does.

Toño worked in a cockroach-infested hole behind an auditorium. There he had all sorts of old equipment: half-built television sets, stripped- down tape recorders, a shitload of tangled wires and, presiding over the disorder, his desk.

"We need a radio station in El Salvador," Jonás told him. "An AM station that can be heard right in the capital city. That's our idea."

Toño fell in love with the project. Before we'd even finished telling him about it, he was looking for a map of El Salvador to study the mountains, calculate distances, heights, valleys, the topography of our little country. The first task we faced wasn't so much learning the ropes as getting hold of equipment. There were legal complications. You can't simply buy a radio transmitter just like that. You need a permit, a licence, a lot of stuff. And since we figured they would try to jam it, Toño suggested we try a short- wave communications radio, which he would try to adapt for AM broadcasting by crystallising the end of the band...

"Whatever, but let's do it now," Jonás interrupted.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rebel Radio: The Story of El Salvador's Radio Venceremos
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.