Rebel Radio: The Story of El Salvador's Radio Venceremos

By José Ignacio López Vigil; Mark Fried | Go to book overview

Section V
On to the Cities

Meeting Our Colleagues

They keep saying Venceremos is in Nicaragua, that we broadcast from Nicaragua, that Daniel Ortega is our godfather and keeps us sitting pretty in Managua. We laugh when we hear that. We know Morazán like our backyard, we've broadcast from every square inch of it. But journalists are like Saint Thomas: they have to see to believe.

During Easter week in '88 four foreign journalists travelled up to Morazán with some UNICEF personnel who had come to vaccinate children.

"Do a live broadcast from Perquín," the commanders told us. "That way those journalists will see where Venceremos really is."

After the show, we sat down to shoot the breeze with the journalists -- one from NBC, another from the BBC, one from the Washington Post, I can't remember the fourth. Atilio had already given interviews in '85 to the New York Times, Le Monde and other foreign media.

"The Salvadoran press is a bit resentful," they told us. "You only talk to journalists from other countries."

It wasn't who we wanted to talk to, it was a question of security. A Salvadoran journalist could put himself in a tight spot if he came to do a live report on us. Anyhow, we figured it was up to them to cover their own asses, so we called a press conference right in Perquín, 'the rebel capital', as the journalists liked to call it. We sent out invitations -- personal ones, through our own channels -- to the director of YSU, the guy from KL, the TV news reporter, the anchor from the other channel, and the correspondents from UPI and the other news agencies. About fifteen local media and a few foreign ones were invited, and nearly all of them accepted gladly. They came up in a caravan and didn't even stop in Gotera to ask the army's permission. They showed up in Perquín happy as could be and bursting with curiosity.

The idea was to hold a press conference with the commanders first, and then let them witness a live Venceremos broadcast.

"We've got to publicise the station," Atilio told us. "In the coming period, the station is going to play a very important role."

"So?"

"It's time you got known. Let your colleagues from the other media know your names, see your faces. Get rid of the station's grey image."

"So?"

"So start by doing something about your looks!"

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rebel Radio: The Story of El Salvador's Radio Venceremos
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Cast of Characters viii
  • Introduction 1
  • Section I the General Offensive 3
  • Footnotes 30
  • Section II Building the Rearguard 31
  • Footnotes 82
  • Section III the Great Battles 83
  • Footnotes 136
  • Section IV Back to Basics 137
  • Footnotes 188
  • Section V on to the Cities 189
  • Footnotes 235
  • Epilogue: When the Fighting Stops 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.