Thailand's Struggle for Democracy: The Life and Times of M. R. Seni Pramoj

By David van Praagh | Go to book overview

6
THE STUDENT REVOLUTION

One of the few certainties for Thailand at the beginning of the 1970s was that the generals ruling the country were confused, out of touch with their people, and giving in to an inertia they neither understood nor could correct.

This was only partly because the Thai attempt to build a working democracy, going back four decades, had been stymied three times in the last two decades. The narrow-minded military bureaucrats who carried out the third coup from within in November 1971 gave no sign of realizing that Thailand's time-frame had changed sharply since the last such episode in 1958. Since 1947, in fact, when the military first intruded after World War II on the nation's political development, conditions in Thailand and in the world around Thailand had changed in ways that undercut the very assumptions of traditional Thai existence.

Despite the retrogressive politics afflicting them, the Thai people were making phenomenal economic and educational strides. Far from following the old fashion of playing off foreign powers against each other and keeping its distance from them, Thailand had entered into an ever closer embrace with one power, the United States.

To Seni Pramoj, "American participation in our country is a consequence of the Free Thai movement—we've got to rely on someone— it was a question of safety."

The special relationship growing out of the two countries' perceiving a common danger, however, can be viewed as following only formally on the Thai-American connection that Seni had helped forge during the war years. Similarly, the exigencies of World War II were different from those that induced the Thai government to recruit American foreign-policy advisers, most of them from the Harvard Law School, from 1903 to 1940. Although the first Asian country

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thailand's Struggle for Democracy: The Life and Times of M. R. Seni Pramoj
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 358

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.