Halfway House: A Comedy of Degrees

By Maurice Hewlett | Go to book overview

V
HOW TO BREAK A HEDGE

MR. JOHN GERMAIN, of Southover House, in Berkshire -- since it is time to be particular about himwas five years older than his brother -- a man of fifty, of habits as settled as his income, and like his income, too, mostly in land. Yet he had literary tastes, a fine library, for instance, of which the nucleus only had been inherited, and the rest selected, bound, and mostly read by himself. He was said to have corresponded with the late Mr. Herbert Spencer, and when he was in town invariably to lunch at the Athenæum, sometimes in the company of that philosopher. In person he was tall, distinguished, very erect, very lean, near-sighted, impassive, and leisurely in his movements. One could not well imagine him running for a train -- and indeed the appointments of his household service must have precluded the possibility. His coachman had been with him five-and- twenty years, his butler thirty, and the rest to correspond. I believe there was not an upper servant in his employ who had not either seen him grow up or been so seen by himself. He lived mostly in the country, upon his estate, and there fulfilled its duties

-45-

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Halfway House: A Comedy of Degrees
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Book I 1
  • I - Mr. Germin Takes Notice 3
  • II - Mr. Germain Revels Sedately 17
  • III - Ditplessis Prevaricates 23
  • IV - A Miss and a Catch 34
  • V - How to Break a Hedge 45
  • VI - Miss Middleham is Invited to Confirm a Vision 55
  • VII - Miss Middleham Has Visions of Her Own 65
  • VIII - Friendship's Garland 74
  • IX - The Welding of the Bolt 91
  • X - Cranylus with Marina: the Incredible Word 103
  • XI - Cool Comfort 113
  • XII - Alarums 123
  • XIII - What They Said at Home 140
  • XIV - The News Reaches the Pyrenees 153
  • XV - A Philosopher Embales 171
  • XVI - Wedding Day 181
  • XVII - The Wedding Night 192
  • Book II 205
  • I - In Which We Pay a First Visit to Southover 207
  • II - Reflections on Honeymoons and Suchlike 221
  • III - Matters of Election 235
  • IV - "London Nights and Days 253
  • V - Lord Gunner Ascertains Where We Are 262
  • VI - Senhouse on the Moral Law 271
  • VII - She Glosses the Text 286
  • VIII - Adventure Crowds Adventure 295
  • IX - The Patteran 304
  • X - The Brothers Touch Bottom 312
  • XI - Of Mary in the North 319
  • XII - Colloquy in the Hills 328
  • XIII - The Suamons 343
  • XIV - Vigil 356
  • XV - The Dead Hand 365
  • XVI - Wings 373
  • XVII - First Flight 385
  • Xviiii - Enter A. Bird-Catcher 393
  • XIX - Heartache and the Philosopher 407
  • XX - In Which Bingo is Unanswerable 418
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