The Campaign Manager: Running and Winning Local Elections

By Catherine M. Shaw | Go to book overview
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How to Use This Handbook
In this section
The Framework
The Layout
Know the Law
Running a local election can seem a bewildering, complicated process. It involves recruiting volunteers, raising money to run the campaign, analyzing how best to allocate people and money, projecting the best image and message, and getting-out-the-vote.This handbook breaks a campaign down into manageable units for easy implementation. If you are the candidate, you will find the necessary tools to run your own campaign. If you have either a paid or volunteer campaign manager, this handbook will organize and guide the two of you and your team through the campaign process.Because of the complexity of the campaign process, take time to read this entire handbook, especially before you design your campaign flowchart or campaign calendar. A campaign makes more sense as a whole.

". . . the seeds of
political success
are sown far in
advance of any
election day. . . .
It is the sum total
of the little things
that happen
which leads to
eventual victory
at the polls."
-- J. Howard
McGrath, Former
Chairman,
Democratic Na-
tional Committee


The Framework
In local politics, there are generally three types of political campaigns:
Partisan: Democrat versus Republican versus Independent.
Nonpartisan: Two or more candidates, with no party affiliation, square off. These elections usually have no primary, only a general election.
Ballot measure or proposition: These represent single issues brought to the voters by a governing body. An initiative or referendum is a single issue brought to voters by a citizen group. Neither involves candidates.

A partisan race differs from other campaigns only in how the precinct analysis is performed for the primary. For example, if you are involved in a partisan race in the primary -- that is, two Republi

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