The Campaign Manager: Running and Winning Local Elections

By Catherine M. Shaw | Go to book overview
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3
The Volunteer Organization
In this chapter Methodology Phone Banks Scripts and Caller Responses Clerical Workers Time Allotments for Volunteer Tasks

No matter where you find your volunteers, you have to organize them and direct their efforts toward activities that will win you the election. Keeping track of your volunteers and assigning them responsibilities requires some sort of organized system. Although the following system can be adapted to a computer, the process I have set up here does not require one.

The methodology as presented in each of these activities really works. If you use it as outlined, you will almost never have no-shows. More to the point, you will be able to utilize your volunteers better and run a more effective campaign. Running an effective campaign means you have done all you can to organize it as efficiently as possible. If you do that, win or lose, you, your committee, and your volunteers can feel very good about what you have accomplished.


Methodology

Make a 3 by 5 inch card for everyone contacted by the campaign. (See figure 3.1.) Make a card even if it turns out that the person contacted does not support your candidate or cause. There had to be a reason the person was contacted in the first place, and after hundreds of calls, you'll forget and waste time by calling again. Keep the 3 by 5 inch cards you fill out for each person contacted together in one box, regardless of what that person says he or she is willing to do. Each 3 by 5 inch contact card is set up exactly the same.

"These things are
good in little
measure and evil
in large: yeast,
salt and hesita-
tion."
-- The Talmud

It is important to keep track of donations because some states require additional information about donors (such as occupation and

-35-

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