The Campaign Manager: Running and Winning Local Elections

By Catherine M. Shaw | Go to book overview

10
Media
In this chapter
Timing Your Ads
Advertising Formats for Newspapers
Endorsements and Endorsement Ads
Letters-to-the-Editor and Free Media
Other Free Media Coverage
Getting on the Front Page and Creating Media Events
Fielding Questions from the Press
Radio and Television
Bumper Stickers and Buttons

The media have a way of legitimizing your cause or your candidate. People are always saying, "It must be true; I read it in the paper" or "They wouldn't print it if it wasn't true." Don't waste the legitimizing effect of the media. Promote yourself and your ideas in a believable way rather than tearing down your opponent, and you'll get the most from your media budget.

Your campaign theme and message must be at the center of your media efforts. Although there will be times when you must answer attacks, do so immediately and then get back on your message as quickly as possible. Use each question to bring the topic around to your message. As I indicated before, once you lay out your campaign, assess your strengths and weaknesses, and establish your message, the media will be your best avenue for bringing this mes sage to the voters. If you take too long in establishing who you are, the opposition will define you first, and the rest of the campaign will be spent digging your way out of a hole.

"The charm of
politics is that
dull as it may be
in action, it is
endlessly fasci-
nating as a re-
hash."
- Eugene
McCarthy

While I dislike negative campaigning, it is inherent in the process. After all, you are running because you embrace values different from your opponent's. If you are working for or against a measure, there is a reason, and as you define that reason, you not only define who you are but who your opposition is. The inverse is true also. If your opponent is telling the voters what he or she represents

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Campaign Manager: Running and Winning Local Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Illustrations xi
  • Preface xv
  • How to Use This Handbook 1
  • 1 - The Campaign Team 5
  • 2 - The Campaign Brochure. 17
  • 3 - The Volunteer Organization 35
  • 4 - Fund-Raising 49
  • 5 - Lawn Signs 91
  • 6 - Precinct Analysis 99
  • 7 - Canvassing 125
  • 8 - Getting-Out-The-Vote (Gotv) 137
  • 9 - Direct Mail 159
  • 10 - Media 171
  • 11 - The Candidate 205
  • 12 - The Issue-Based Campaign 235
  • 13 - The Campaign Flowchart 249
  • 14 - After the Ball 255
  • Afterword 257
  • Appendix 1 - Forms for Photocopying 259
  • Appendix 2 - The State Initiative and Referendum Process 271
  • Appendix 3 - Directory of Campaign Web Sites and Other Resources 277
  • Index 281
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.