The Campaign Manager: Running and Winning Local Elections

By Catherine M. Shaw | Go to book overview

13
The Campaign Flowchart
In this chapter
Building Your Campaign Flowchart
The Campaign Calendar

You have now almost completed this handbook; based on your time, resources, and volunteer base, you have decided what campaign activities you are capable of doing. You are now ready to create a campaign flowchart, which actually marks the beginning of your campaign. Start by listing the tasks you need to complete before the election. These might be canvassing, brochure development, media, phone banks, and lawn signs. Your choice, of course, is dictated by your resources and the type of campaign you are running. For example, you may not be able to afford direct mail even though you'd love to use it, or you may have decided you do not want to use lawn signs because they are unnecessary in the ballot measure election for which you're campaigning.

Once you have the list of campaign tasks, transfer them onto your campaign flowchart in the proper sequence. A mockup of a campaign flowchart appears in figure 13.1, and there is a blank flowchart grid in Appendix 1. Please feel free to copy it for your campaign use.


Building Your Campaign Flowchart

A flowchart is an essential tool in any successful campaign. It is helpful for the campaign team because members can see the plan of the whole campaign. Flowcharts keep the campaign organized. I have also found that the chart can have a calming effect on the candidate and staff because it clearly outlines exactly what needs to be done and when. I like to do my flowcharts in color.

"Simply reacting
to the present
demand or
scrambling be-
cause of tensions
is the opposite of
thoughtful plan-
ning. Planning
emphasizes con-
scious, disci-
plined choice."
-- Vaughn Keeler

To construct your flowchart, you will need a long, unbroken wall, and you will need to gather the following items:

-249-

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The Campaign Manager: Running and Winning Local Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Illustrations xi
  • Preface xv
  • How to Use This Handbook 1
  • 1 - The Campaign Team 5
  • 2 - The Campaign Brochure. 17
  • 3 - The Volunteer Organization 35
  • 4 - Fund-Raising 49
  • 5 - Lawn Signs 91
  • 6 - Precinct Analysis 99
  • 7 - Canvassing 125
  • 8 - Getting-Out-The-Vote (Gotv) 137
  • 9 - Direct Mail 159
  • 10 - Media 171
  • 11 - The Candidate 205
  • 12 - The Issue-Based Campaign 235
  • 13 - The Campaign Flowchart 249
  • 14 - After the Ball 255
  • Afterword 257
  • Appendix 1 - Forms for Photocopying 259
  • Appendix 2 - The State Initiative and Referendum Process 271
  • Appendix 3 - Directory of Campaign Web Sites and Other Resources 277
  • Index 281
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