The Fateful Hoaxing of Margaret Mead: A Historical Analysis of Her Samoan Research

By Derek Freeman | Go to book overview

10
In Fitiuta:
"A Gold Mine, Ethnologically"

ALTHOUGH IT HAD NOTHING TO DO with her study for Franz Boas on heredity and environment in relation to adolescence, Mead had planned, from the time of her first arrival in Manu'a, to visit Fitiuta for research "of a strictly ethnological nature" for the Bishop Museum. She had, however, deliberately "procrastinated" until she had acquired a sufficiently "fluent command" of Samoan. By February 1926, even though she had been living in the U.S. Naval Dispensary with other Americans, she had become proficient enough in Samoan to act as an interpreter at a court held by Lieutenant Commander Edell and at an "emergency case" for Edward Holt, when "both nurses were at the other end of the village." She thus felt ready by February 20, 1926, to tackle the ethnological research that she wanted to do in Fitiuta. Once there, she only "tried an interpreter once," when she used a native nurse to communicate with an old midwife named Fa'agi. Thereafter, except in her conversations with the Samoan schoolteacher, Andrew Napoleon, who spoke fluent English, she "gave up attempting interpreters and worked on everything from religion to medicines without them." 1

Getting to Fitiuta, which was seven miles from the naval dispensary by a rough foot track, was something of an ordeal for visiting Americans. According to Mead, the sanitary inspectors and other government officials who "had to make the trip dreaded it, articulating for a week before, and came back to be nursed and sympathized with for a week afterwards." Mead found the trail "awful" with "miles of mud,"

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fateful Hoaxing of Margaret Mead: A Historical Analysis of Her Samoan Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.