Alzheimer's Disease: A Guide for Families

By Lenore S. Powell; Katie Courtice | Go to book overview

Epilogue
Alzheimer's disease is a burden that only the patient can forget. We are all victims of this tragic illness. Only through public recognition of the enormity of the problem of Alzheimer's disease and its emotional and economic impact on the family and on society will new funding and adequate resources become a government priority. We should educate our legislators and alert them to the fact that about two million people suffer impairment through some form of memory loss and two million more suffer from mild cognitive impairment.All too often, legislators and professional people only take notice of the severity of the illness when one of their own family members becomes afflicted. You can be instrumental in bringing this dread disease out into public awareness by educating yourself, your family, neighbors, and friends. Talk to people. Write your concerns to the National Council on Aging and to your state and local aging offices. Work with organizations for advocacy for the elderly. Get the press interested in these issues.Whatever you have gained from reading this book, share it, not only with people who are personally involved with a memory-impaired relative, but also with others who may benefit. Remember these helpful words:
Ȃ Take life one day at a time.
Ȃ Know your limitations.
Ȃ Acknowledge that your supreme value is love.
Ȃ Send your love out into the world -- it will flow back to you.
Ȃ Be positive about life, laugh, and discover joy in living.

If just one person benefits from having read this book, we will have accomplished our goal.

-339-

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