Words at Work: Business Writing in Half the Time with Twice the Power

By Susan Benjamin | Go to book overview

The Must-Read Introduction

WHY YOU MUST WRITE BETTER DOCUMENTS FASTER!
Fast. That's how the business world approaches writing. Pondering a message before setting finger to keyboard -- a relic from yesterday. Writing, rewriting, and rewriting again -- a luxury reserved for English composition classes. And missed deadlines? Death to any organization, whether a 2-person business or a 25,000-employee corporation. Today you must get your messages out in record time, sometimes literally minutes after speaking with a client or attending a meeting.But that's only half the problem. These quickly written documents must be livelier, more interesting, and more immediately intriguing to readers than ever before. In fact, if the average letter isn't captivating within the first five words, the readers either skim the message or throw it away. Why? Consider these facts:
The average reader watches four to eight hours of television daily. Most of the images people spend so much time watching flash every two to three seconds -- at the slowest. These images are provocative, too, darting from murdered bodies to couples in bed. Furthermore, most readers spend considerable TV time clicking the remote. I know a professor of literature and poetry who holds a Ph.D. in philosophy. On weekends, this connoisseur of contemporary language stations himself on the couch, clicker in hand, riding the on-air waves. Once, I timed the moments this otherwise

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Words at Work: Business Writing in Half the Time with Twice the Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for Words at Work i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • The Must-Read Introduction 1
  • Step 1 - Listing 7
  • Step 2 - Writing 43
  • Step 3 - Rewriting for Structure 71
  • Step 4 - Editing for Word Use 103
  • Step 5 - Showing 147
  • Step 6 - Proofreading 166
  • Models 211
  • The Last Word 233
  • Index 235
  • About Words at Work *
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