Words at Work: Business Writing in Half the Time with Twice the Power

By Susan Benjamin | Go to book overview

The Last Word

Remember that collection of letters and other documents that you set aside at the beginning of the book? Every so often I've told you to use that file to test some technique. Maybe you did, maybe you didn't. But you should definitely pull out those old documents now.

Compare those letters and memos to the documents you wrote after reading the steps. Do you see how much more powerful your writing has become? Do you remember how much time and effort you had to put into writing before? Now that you've gotten used to the Words at Work technique, do you see how smoothly your words flow?

To ensure that what you've learned doesn't slip away, keep this book in the office where you do most of your writing. Mark sections about recurring problems. Every few months, or whenever you face a big writing assignment, flip through those pages to remind yourself of what you've learned.

This book can also help you solve everyday business-writing problems. I didn't have space to tell you what sort of salutation to use in a letter to the king of Norway,* but I tried to answer my clients' most common questions.

Finally, remember that writing is a craft, just as sewing is. Some people are spectacularly skilled at the craft of sewing, while others never manage much more than replacing a button. But we all feel more secure knowing that, in a emergency, we can repair a split seam in our pants. Similarly, we all feel happier and more productive when we know how to make words work for us.

____________________
*
Okay, it's "Your Royal Highness:"

-233-

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Words at Work: Business Writing in Half the Time with Twice the Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for Words at Work i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • The Must-Read Introduction 1
  • Step 1 - Listing 7
  • Step 2 - Writing 43
  • Step 3 - Rewriting for Structure 71
  • Step 4 - Editing for Word Use 103
  • Step 5 - Showing 147
  • Step 6 - Proofreading 166
  • Models 211
  • The Last Word 233
  • Index 235
  • About Words at Work *
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