Field Guide to the American Teenager: A Parent's Companion

By Joseph Di Prisco; Michael Riera | Go to book overview

12
Being Gay, Coming Out

I go on writing so that I will always have something to read.

-- JEANETTE WINTERSON, THE PASSION

Mothers of America let your kids go to the movies!

-- FRANK O'HARA, "AVE MARIA"


Wherever You Are, There You Go

Everybody loves Sheila. If you could say that anyone in particular sets the social rules around school, she does. For instance, whatever she wears on Monday somehow becomes the height of fashion by Thursday noon. Some teachers find her shallow but some find her interesting, and a lot more substantial than she appears. Usually adults can't help but like her, though, and they think she is amusing in that just this side of sarcastic way. Others wish the girl would give the old act a rest. As for her friends, her legion of friends, they say she's already a party animal legend, and it's only her junior year.

Although Sheila made it a point of personal pride to get along with everybody, she knew she wasn't really that close to anybody. Stacey Witte was a teacher she liked, even if she was a teacher. They used to chat, very friendly, before and after class, stopping on campus, that sort of thing.

-191-

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