Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream

By H. G. Bissinger | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
East Versus
West

I

THE NIGHT BEFORE THE FOURTH GAME OF THE SEASON AGAINST Odessa High, Gaines locked the doors of the field house for a team meeting. Private gatherings such as this were not held very often -- only when the idea of defeat became not only unthinkable but intolerable. Losing to the cross-town rival from the west was one of those situations, a possibility even more horrid to Permian fans than that of Michael Dukakis becoming president.

To put the game into perspective and draw the proper parallels, Gaines told the players the story of Sam Davis.

Davis had been a Confederate scout during the Civil War when he came face to face during battle with a scout from the Union army. With the battle over for the day they sat in the moonlight and talked, and before they parted the Union scout revealed secrets about his own army's position. When Davis was subsequently captured by Union forces, he was told he could go free if he revealed the name of the person who had given him the information. But Davis had no interest in such a lowhanded compromise. "I would die a thousand deaths before I would betray a friend" were his final words.

It was a vignette that was deemed appropriate on the occasion of the Odessa High game, much like the quotation from H. L. Mencken that had been posted on the field house bulletin board:

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Nationwide Acclaim for Friday Night Lights *
  • Title Page ii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Prologue 1
  • Pre- Season 21
  • Chapter 1 - Odessa 23
  • Chapter 2 - The Watermelon Feed 38
  • Chapter 3 - Boobie 53
  • The Season 71
  • Chapter 4 - Dreaming of Heroes 73
  • Chapter 5 - Black and White 89
  • Chapter 6 - The Ambivalence of Ivory 111
  • Chapter 7 - School Days 128
  • Chapter 8 - East versus West 153
  • Chapter 9 - Friday Night Politics 173
  • Chapter 10 - Boobie Who? 194
  • Push for the Playoffs 209
  • Chapter 11 - Sisters 211
  • Chapter 12 - Civil War 233
  • Chapter 13 - Heads or Tails 251
  • Post- Season 265
  • Chapter 15 - The Algebraic Equation 291
  • Chapter 16 - Field of Dreams 313
  • Epilogue 339
  • Afterword 357
  • Acknowledgments 367
  • Contents *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 367

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.