East European Communities: The Struggle for Balance in Turbulent Times

By David A. Kideckel | Go to book overview

The annual survey results in Schloßberg clearly indicate a growing disillusion with the new political and economic system. Questions aimed at tapping support for liberal democracy, for example, show a substantial skepticism about democracy and its ability to solve Germany's problems. About half of all respondents were not sure that democracy in Germany was the best political system, and twice as many people expressed preference for a different system than for the current one. Similarly, less than one third of the respondents believe that the democratic system can solve Germany's problems, and an increasing number of persons (36% in 1992 and 44% in 1994) said that democracy cannot solve the existing problems. While these statements are not yet reflected in strong electoral preferences for non-democratic parties, the Schloßberg survey results show growing support for the right-wing Republikaner party. In 1992, less than 2% of students expressed party preference for the Republicans. In 1994, 10% of all student respondents would vote for the Republicans in the general election; that percentage is 13.5 for students from the vocationally-oriented school.

The socio-political situation in Schloßberg -- as in many parts of Eastern Germany -- thus is one of ambiguity. Many people are able to develop private initiatives and are prospering. Those with jobs -- especially in the state sector and in financial services -- are doing very well. Not surprisingly, these developments have sharply increased the socioeconomic differences in the community.This stratification occurs along many dimensions:home ownership, employment, schooling, and gender. Women's unemployment, for example, is twice the level of that for males. 20 A critical milestone for the trajectory of the new system is coming up later this year when many of the labor-market measures taken by the government to ease unemployment will expire. If the economy by then does not create sufficient demand to absorb these retrained workers, the current discontent is likely to intensify. Four of the five eastern German states will have elections in 1994, and the national election is set for the fall of 1994. There is no doubt that the CDU will be turned out of office in most of the eastern German states (with the likely exception of Saxony). 21 What is unclear is whether former CDU supporters shift to the other centrist party -- SPD -- or to the political fringes. If the latter happens, it is far more likely that Germany's political spectrum shifts to the right than to the left, in contrast to other formerly communist countries where there is a resurgence of support for former communists.


Notes
Revision of a paper presented at the annual meetings of the Rural Sociological Society, State College, PA, August 1992. This research was supported by grants from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and the Humboldt Foundation. I

-80-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
East European Communities: The Struggle for Balance in Turbulent Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 251

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.