Decoding Darkness: The Search for the Genetic Causes of Alzheimer's Disease

By Rudolph E. Tanzi; Ann B. Parson | Go to book overview

Whereas Julia had understood so little about her illness, her ten children knew its name, knew its damage, and had a dim sense that they were genetically susceptible to their mother's rare form of the disease. In 1991, their ages, which ranged from twenty-seven to forty-nine, nearly paralleled the years during which the disease's early onset usually struck. They had read that mutations connected to it had been found, but that didn't make their at-risk situation necessarily any more real. No certain signs of it had appeared among them, and they lived their lives around other thoughts -- their attachments, their marriages, their careers, and the sons and daughters they were bringing into the world. They'd been told that the disease mostly hit twins; perhaps it would travel no further than their mother and her identical twin Agnes, who had developed Alzheimer's some ten years after Julia. Perhaps the Tatro twins' affliction had been some sort of genetic fluke. Maybe it had been only that.

-134-

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Decoding Darkness: The Search for the Genetic Causes of Alzheimer's Disease
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • One - Cleave, Zap, Blot, Probe *
  • Two - The Core of the Matter 20
  • Three - Candidate Chromosome 48
  • Four - Gone Fishing 60
  • Five - Curious Gene 84
  • Six - From Famine to Feast 98
  • Seven - Mutations, Revelations 114
  • Eight - Of Mice and People 134
  • Nine - Gene Prix 146
  • Ten - The 42 Nidus 172
  • Eleven - Untangling a Cascade 190
  • Twelve - A Gamble for Hope 206
  • Epilogue 240
  • Resources 249
  • Notes 251
  • Index 269
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