Decoding Darkness: The Search for the Genetic Causes of Alzheimer's Disease

By Rudolph E. Tanzi; Ann B. Parson | Go to book overview
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Chapter 1
7 The idea of using DNA variations to map the human genome was
just entering the collective consciousness. A now historic paper pub-
lished that May theoretically set forth the inestimable value of this
undertaking. Among its authors were David Botstein at MIT and
Raymond White at the University of Massachusetts, Worcester, the
earliest and most vocal advocates of making use of DNA variations
to dissect the human genome. The paper's reference follows: Bot-
stein, D., White, R. L., Skolnick, M., and Davis, R. W., "Construc-
tion of a Genetic Linkage Map in Man Using Restriction Fragment
Length Polymorphisms", American Journal of Human Genetics 32,
314-331 ( 1980).
7 Throughout history, Huntington's contortions were frequently and
tragically misinterpreted. Various documents provide evidence that
in Colonial times a strain of Huntington's connected to an English
family that arrived in Boston Bay in 1630 was responsible for certain
descendants in that family being viewed and tried as witches-no-
tably a woman named Elizabeth Knapp, the alleged Groton witch.
One interesting reference is a paper by P. R. Vessie, "On the Trans-
mission of Huntington's Chorea for 300 Years", Journal of Nervous and
Mental Disease 76
( December 1932), 553.
17 The G8 probe's general location on chromosome 4 was detected by
Susan Naylor, a molecular geneticist at the Roswell Park Memorial
Institute in Buffalo. Naylor had developed a unique method for
matching bits of DNA to their chromosomal home that involved
propagating human chromosomes inside rodent cells.

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