Winner Takes All: Exceptional People Teach Us How to Find Career and Personal Success in the 21st Century

By Noelle Nelson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
BELIEVE IN A POSITIVE FUTURE
When I Look into the Future, What Do I See?

Beliefs are the bedrock upon which all experience is built. Your success depends on the beliefs you hold. What you believe determines how you go about things, whether you seek out one type of situation or another, and what you are or are not willing to try. Beliefs that in the past wouldn't have held you back, nowadays will.

For example, you may believe that "you can't teach an old dog new tricks." As long as our world was relatively stable, you didn't have to learn many "new tricks" once you were an adult and functioning comfortably in society. For generations, if you were a typesetter for example, you could work for a newspaper your whole life without altering how you did your typesetting hardly at all. Your belief that "you can't teach an old dog new tricks" didn't affect your success. But with the explosion of change in every area, it's no longer possible to be successful without being willing to learn new skills. Beliefs that mattered little before, now take on critical importance.

So, for example, given your belief that "you can't teach an old dog new tricks," you believe you're too old, at all of 54 years of age, to learn how to work with computers -- even though you're well aware of the growing importance of computers in virtually all businesses. So you don't seek out people-friendly computer courses or schools, you don't try to

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