Winner Takes All: Exceptional People Teach Us How to Find Career and Personal Success in the 21st Century

By Noelle Nelson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
CREATE A NEW FOUNDATION
FOR SUCCESS
Who Am I? What Do I See in Me?

We used to say "I'm a sales rep, a teacher, a lawyer, a secretary, a convenience store manager, an orderly, a housewife, a school janitor," or whatever our occupation was, and base our sense of "Who I am" on our ability to do that specific thing. You'd learn how to do something, and you could legitimately expect that with a few adjustments and adaptations to new technology or ways of doing things, you could do pretty much the same thing your whole life. New technology didn't get implemented all that quickly and certainly not industry-wide overnight.

All that has changed dramatically. Basing your ability to go forward successfully into your Future on a specific set of skills is a death sentence. Too rarely are those skills going to remain constant, and if they do, then the context or the form in which those skills are used will change dramatically. Take doctors, for example. Doctors with the degree "M.D." have been the primary recognized and accepted health care givers in our society for generations. The medical profession seemed to be one that would never change, at least not in terms of their secure status, economic power, or the way the profession was run. In the past 10 years, however, the rise of alternative health care givers and the numbers of people who treat with them has been astonishing. Not only do many people prefer alternative health care, but traditional M.D.'s now have to take into account and frequently

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