Winner Takes All: Exceptional People Teach Us How to Find Career and Personal Success in the 21st Century

By Noelle Nelson | Go to book overview

If there is no support group that addresses your particular situation, then find a church, synagogue, book club, bowling team, or community group of some kind where there are people you can relate to. When you get involved with a group of individuals, it's as if you multiplied yourself by however many people are in the group. Since everybody is different, everybody has a different view on things and different sources they rely on; you exponentially increase your personal access to resources by involving yourself with a group.


Step #3: Create Your Personal Resource File

Make lists of everything and everyone in your world you can think of as a resource. Describe what resources that individual or source might provide for you, and keep these lists handy for future reference. Add the names of people and resource possibilities to your list as they occur to you.


Step #4: Use Your Imagination

Always remember: your greatest resource is your imagination, your creativity, not "How it's always been done," or "How I've always done things," but "Here's how I could do it," "Here's a different way I could try." Continually exercise your mind, and practice using your imagination to look into the Future. Your Dream is the light guiding you through the Unknown to your success. Your resources are the steps you take to get you there.

Your attitude, however, is what determines whether you will take those steps successfully or not. There are attitudes that will solidly support the realization of your Dream, and others that will only drag you down. Winners (no surprise!) have winning attitudes.


NOTES
1.
"Love, Dad" People Magazine, July 27, 1998, p. 72.
2.
Tom Brokaw, "American Close Up" NBC Nightly News, February 23, 1996.
3.
Mark Miller, "That Physical Touch" Los Angeles Times Magazine, September 14, 1997, p. 5.
4.
"Man around the House", People Magazine, April 27, 1998, p. 89.

-134-

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