Mindstorms: Children, Computers, and Powerful Ideas

By Seymour Papert | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Piaget is at the center of the concerns of this book. I make a slightly unorthodox interpretation of his theoretical position and a very unorthodox interpretation of the implications of his theory for education. The reader who would like to return to the source needs some guidance because Piaget has written a large number of books, most of which discuss particular aspects of children's development, assuming that the others have been read as a theoretical preface. The best short book about Piaget is M. Boden Piaget ( London: Harvester Press, 1979). A good starting place for reading Piaget's own texts is with H. E. Gruber and J. J. Voneche, eds., The Essential Piaget: An Interpretive Reference and Guide ( New York: Basic Books, 1977). My own "short list" of books by Piaget that are most readable and provide the best philosophical overview of his ideas are: The Child's Conception of the World ( New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1929); The Child's Conception of Physical Causality ( New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1932); The Psychology of Intelligence, trans. Malcolm Piercy and D. E. Berlyne ( New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1950); The Origins of Intelligence in Children, trans. Margaret Cook ( London: Routledge and Kegan Paul); Introduction à l'Epistémologie Génétique ( Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1950); In- sights and Illusions in Philosophy, trans. Wolfe Mays ( New York: The World Publishing Co., 1971); The Grasp of Consciousness, trans. Susan Wedgwood ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1976). For a critique of the "Piaget Curriculum Developers," of whom I have said that they are "standing Piaget on his head," see G. Groen, "The Theoretical Ideas of Piaget and Educational Practice," The Impact of Research on Education, ed. P. Suppes ( Washington D. C.: The National Academy of Education, 1978).
2.
LOGO is the name of a philosophy of education in a growing family of computer languages that goes with it. Characteristic features of the LOGO family of languages include procedural definitions with local variables to permit recursion. Thus, in LOGO it is possible to define new commands and functions which then can be used exactly like primitive ones. LOGO is an interpretive language. This means that it can be used interactively. The modern LOGO systems have full list structure, that is to say, the language can operate on lists whose members can themselves be lists, lists of lists, and so forth. Some versions have elements of parallel processing and of message passing in order to facilitate graphics programming. An example of a powerful use of list structure is the representation of LOGO procedures themselves as lists of lists so that LOGO procedures can construct, modify, and run other LOGO procedures. Thus LOGO is not a "toy," a language only for children. The examples of simple uses of LOGO in this book do however illustrate some ways in which LOGO is special in that it is designed to provide very early and easy entry routes into programming for beginners with no prior mathematical knowledge. The subset of LOGO containing Turtle commands, the most used "entry route" for beginners, is referred to in this book as "TURTLE TALK" to take account of the fact that other computer languages, for example SMALLTALK and PASCAL, have implemented Turtles on their systems using commands originally developed in the LOGO language. The TURTLE TALK subset of LOGO is easily transportable to other languages.

It should be carefully remembered that LOGO is never conceived as a final product or offered as "the definitive language." Here I present it as a sample to show that something better is possible.

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mindstorms: Children, Computers, and Powerful Ideas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.