Signs of Life: How Complexity Pervades Biology

By Ricard Solé; Brian Goodwin | Go to book overview

FIVE
Brain Dynamics

We are barely beginning to address the fact that interactions among many non-contiguous brain regions probably yield highly complex biological states that are vastly more than the sum of its parts. -- Antonio Damasio


Into the Black Box

The human brain is the most astonishing and mysterious of all known complex systems. Inside this mass of billions of neurons, information flows in ways that we are only starting to understand. The memories of a summer day on the beach when we were kids; imagination; our dreams of impossible worlds. Consciousness. Our surprising capacity for mathematical generalization and understanding of deep, sometimes counterintuitive questions about the universe. Our brains are capable of this and much more. How? We don't know: the mind is a daunting problem for science.

When a brain fails, its failure can be as puzzling as normal function. Sometimes mental disorders are comical, as with poor Don Quixote, who, after many nights of no sleep and too much reading of old books, started to confuse reality with tales about dragons and chivalry (Figure 5.1). Sometimes the injured brain acts in ways that are simply bizarre. The essays of Oliver Sacks give us an impressive list of examples. 1 One of Sacks's patients was a musician and teacher who began to have problems recognizing the faces of his students. He could recognize, for example, familiar voices, but faces became strange

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Signs of Life: How Complexity Pervades Biology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • One - Nonlinearity, Chaos, and Emergence 1
  • Two - Order, Complexity, Disorder 29
  • Three - Genetic Networks, Cell Differentiation, and Development 61
  • Four - Physiology on the Edge of Chaos 89
  • Five - Brain Dynamics 119
  • Six - Ants, Brains, and Chaos 147
  • Seven - The Baroque of Nature 179
  • Eight - Life on the Edge of Catastrophe 211
  • Nine - Evolution and Extinction 243
  • Ten - Fractal Cities and Market Crashes 277
  • Notes 305
  • Index 317
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.