A Reader's Guide to Fifty Modern European Poets

By John Pilling | Go to book overview

Osip Mandelstam (1891-1938

Born in Warsaw, the son of an eccentric leather manufacturer steeped in German and Jewish culture and a cultured mother who was fond of music. Grew up in St Petersburg, where he was educated at the distinguished Tenishev school and received a classical education. Visited Paris in 1907, where he became interested in the French Symbolist poets. Studied Old French Literature at Heidelberg University in 1910, during which year he made two visits to Italy and spent some time at the Sorbonne. A student of Romance and German philology at St Petersburg University in 1911. Famous in Petersburg literary circles after the publication of his first volume Stone (1913), reprinted three years later. Employed by the authorities in Moscow in 1918; in 1919 in Kiev, where he met his wife. Briefly arrested in Feodosia during the confusion of the Civil War; jailed in Georgia on suspicion of being a Bolshevik spy. Returned to Petrograd, then briefly in Moscow, having reunited with his wife in Kiev. In Tiflis in the Caucasus for six months. Employed as a translator on returning to Leningrad. Resident in Tsarskoye Selo with his wife and Anna Akhmatova from 1925 onwards, with summer spells in the Crimea. Accused of plagiarism in 1928. Journeyed to Armenia in 1930-31. Wrote a poem in denunciation of Stalin in 1934, news of which reached the authorities through the agency of an informer. Arrested and interrogated in 1934; exiled for three years to Voronezh. Arrested on 1 May 1938 and never seen again. Presumed to have died of ill-health or been murdered by camp guards in Vladivostok in December of the same year.

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A Reader's Guide to Fifty Modern European Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • Charles Baudelaire (1821-67) 13
  • Stéphane Mallarmé (1842-98) 23
  • Paul Verlaine (1844-96) 32
  • Tristan Corbière (1845-75) 40
  • Arthur Rimbaud (1854-91) 47
  • Constantine Cavafy (1863-1933) 56
  • Stefan George (1868-1933) 64
  • Christian Morgenstern (1871-1914) 73
  • Paul Valéry (1871-1945) 80
  • Hugo Von Hofmannsthal (1874-1929) 88
  • Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926) 97
  • Antonio Machado (1875-1939) 108
  • Guillaume Apollinaire (1880-1918) 118
  • Aleksandr Blok (1880-1921) 127
  • Juan Ramón Jiménez (1881-1958) 136
  • Umberto Saba (1883-1957) 143
  • Dino Campana (1885-1932) 150
  • Gottfried Benn (1886-1956) 158
  • Georg Trakl (1887-1914) 166
  • Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935) 173
  • Giuseppe Ungaretti (1888-1970) 181
  • Pierre Reverdy (1889-1960) 190
  • Anna Akhmatova (1889-1966) 197
  • Boris Pasternak (1890-1960) 206
  • Osip Mandelstam (1891-1938 215
  • César Vallejo (1892-1938) 225
  • Marina Tsvetaeva (1892-1941) 234
  • Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893-1930) 243
  • Paul Éluard (1895-1952) 259
  • Eugenio Montale (1896-1981) 266
  • Federico Garcia Lorca (1898-1936) 276
  • Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) 284
  • Jorge Luis Borges (born 1899) 292
  • George Seferis (1900-71 ) 301
  • Salvatore Quasimodo (1901-68) 308
  • Lucio Piccolo (1901-69) 316
  • Attila József (1902-37) 324
  • Pablo Neruda (1904-73) 333
  • René Char (born 1907) 344
  • Cesare Pavese (1908-50) 351
  • Yannis Ritsos (born 1909) 360
  • Octavio Paz (born 1914) 368
  • Johannes Bobrowski (1917-65) 376
  • Paul Celan (1920-70) 383
  • Vasko Popa (born 1922) 392
  • Yves Bonnefoy (born 1923) 400
  • Yehuda Amichai (born 1924) 408
  • Zbigniew Herbert (born 1924) 416
  • Joseph Brodsky (born 1940) 424
  • Bibliographies 432
  • Index 461
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