A Reader's Guide to Fifty Modern European Poets

By John Pilling | Go to book overview

César Vallejo (1892-1938)

Born in Santiago de Chuco, Peru, of mixed Spanish and Indian origin. Enjoyed a contented rural middle class childhood as the youngest of eleven children; brought up in an atmosphere of religious piety. Briefly studied medicine at the University of Lima in 1911; in 1912 worked as an assistant cashier on a sugar plantation, an experience which awakened in him a sympathy for the exploited workers. Studied Law and Literature at the University of Trujillo from 1913 to 1917, supporting himself by teaching. Graduated with a dissertation on 'Romanticism in Castilian Poetry'. Associated with avant-garde literary elements in Trujillo and involved in a number of relationships with women, the break-up of one of which prompted him to leave Trujillo. Profoundly upset by the death of his mother in 1918. A student and schoolteacher in Lima in 1918-19. Imprisoned for four months as an innocent bystander at riots in Santiago in 1920, and released with charges unproved, an experience which influenced the poems collected in Trilce ( 1922). Disappointed by the cold reaction to Trilce, he left Peru for Europe in 1923. Settled in Paris in cheap hotels, knowing little French and very poor. Operated on for an internal haemorrhage in the autumn of 1924. Supported himself by writing journalism in the next few years. Became deeply interested in Marxism in 1927-8. Visited Russia after a serious illness in 1928 and again in 1929. Married in 1929. Several times arrested in Paris and expelled for his political affiliations in 1930. Moved to Madrid, where he and his wife endured great hardship. Wrote primarily in prose between 1930 and 1932. Joined the Spanish Communist party and

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Reader's Guide to Fifty Modern European Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 479

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.