A Reader's Guide to Fifty Modern European Poets

By John Pilling | Go to book overview

Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893-1930)

Born in Bagdadi, now Mayakovsky, Georgia, the son of a forester. Grew up speaking Georgian, though taught Russian at school. Joined the Bolshevik movement in 1908, having read revolutionary pamphlets as a child. Resident in Moscow after the death of his father in 1906. Arrested for the first time in 1908, and twice arrested in 1909, on the second occasion being sent to Butyrki prison. Entered art school in 1911. Encountered the avant-garde painter David Burliuk and became one of the prime movers of the Russian Futurist movement. Met Lili Brik in 1915, having first courted her sister Elsa (later married to Louis Aragon) among others. Lived in Moscow with Lili Brik and her husband from 1915 to 1917, often threatened suicide because of difficulties in his affair' with Lili Brik, despite her complaisant husband. In Petrograd for the 1917 Revolution. Moved with the Briks to Moscow on its reinstatement as the capital of the country in 1919, where he became a public performer, film actor and poster artist. Often quarrelled publicly with the equally flamboyant poet Sergei Esenin. Endured periods of separation from Lili Brik with what little fortitude he could muster, her husband acting as peacemaker between them. Worked in advertising and propaganda from 1923 to 1925. Visited Mexico and North America in 1925, after which time he and Lili were no longer intimate. In his last years engaged in demanding lecture tours all over the Soviet Union. Fell in love with a White émigré resident in Paris, whom he wished to marry; refused an exit visa in 1927. Exhausted, depressed by public criticism of his poetry, disturbed by the failure of the First Five Year Plan and emotionally unsatisfied, he shot

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Reader's Guide to Fifty Modern European Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 479

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.